Violent Offenses

Greg Beebe Violent Offense Attorney

Violent offenses, or violent crimes, are crimes in which there is intentional harm inflicted upon another individual during the commission of a crime. The infliction of the harm can include the use of weapons, poison, bodily contact, and much more.

In 2014, there were about 6,500 violent crimes committed in Montana, with aggravated assault taking the top spot for most violent crime reported. Violent crimes are also crimes that can very easily go unreported because of threats and other issues.

In most states, violent crimes are considered to be felonies that carry very serious fines and penalties such as a sentence of one year or more in prison. Violent offenses are among the most serious crimes that someone can commit.

Attorney for Violent Offenses in Helena, Montana

If you were arrested for a violent crime in the state of Montana, you need to contact an experienced criminal defense attorney immediately to discuss your case.

Greg Beebe is an aggressive criminal defense attorney at Beebe Law Firm. He understands the severity of allegations regarding violent crimes. Violent crimes in any state are serious offenses, so contacting the Beebe Law Firm should be the first thing you do after being accused of such a crime. Greg Beebe is ready to represent you if you were charged with a violent offense.

Greg Beebe represents residents in Helena in Lewis and Clark County, Boulder in Jefferson County, Missoula in Missoula County, Bozeman Gallatin County, and other surrounding areas in Montana.


Information Center for Violent Offenses in Helena, MT

  •  Deliberate Homicide
  •  Negligent Homicide
  •  Vehicular Homicide While Under the Influence
  •  Assault
  •  Aggravated Assault
  •  Kidnapping
  •  Aggravated Kidnapping

Deliberate Homicide

A person commits the offense of deliberate homicide if:

  1. the person purposely or knowingly causes the death of another human being; or
  2. the person attempts to commit, commits, or is legally accountable for the attempt or commission of robbery, sexual intercourse without consent, arson, burglary, kidnapping, aggravated kidnapping, felonious escape, assault with a weapon, aggravated assault, or any other forcible felony and in the course of the forcible felony or flight thereafter, the person or any person legally accountable for the crime causes the death of another human being.

A person convicted of the offense of deliberate homicide shall be punished by death, unless the person is less than 18 years of age at the time of the commission of the offense, by life imprisonment, or by imprisonment in the state prison for a term of not less than 10 years or more than 100 years.


Negligent Homicide

A person commits the offense of negligent homicide if the person negligently causes the death of a human being.

To convict the Defendant of Negligent Homicide, the State must prove the following elements:

  1. the defendant caused the death of a human being; and
  2. the defendant acted negligently.

A person convicted of negligent homicide shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a maximum of 20 years or be fined a maximum amount of $50,000, or both.


Vehicular Homicide While Under the Influence

A person commits the offense of vehicular homicide while under the influence if the person negligently causes the death of another human being while the person is operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

To convict the defendant of vehicular homicide while under the influence, the state must prove the following elements:

  1. the defendant caused the death of another person; and
  2. at the time the defendant caused the death of another person; the defendant was operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs; and
  3. the Defendant acted negligently.

A person convicted of vehicular homicide while under the influence shall be imprisoned in a state prison for a maximum of 30 years or be fined a maximum amount of $50,000, or both. Imposition of a sentence may not be deferred.


Assault

A person commits the offense of assault if the person:

  1. purposely or knowingly causes bodily injury to another; or
  2. negligently causes bodily injury to another with a weapon; or
  3. purposely or knowingly makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature with any individual; or
  4. purposely or knowingly causes reasonable apprehension of bodily injury in another.

To convict the defendant of assault, the State must prove the following elements:

  1. the defendant caused bodily injury to another person;
  2. the defendant made a physical contact of a provoking or insulting nature on another person;
  3. the defendant caused a reasonable apprehension of bodily harm; and
  4. the defendant acted purposely or knowingly; or
  5. the defendant caused bodily injury to another person with a weapon; and
  6. the defendant acted negligently.

A person convicted of an assault shall be fined a maximum of $500 or be imprisoned in the county jail for a maximum of 6 months, or both.


Aggravated Assault

A person commits the offense of aggravated assault if the individual:

  1. purposely or knowingly causes serious bodily injury to another; or
  2. intentionally or knowingly, with the use of physical force or contact, causes reasonable apprehension of serious bodily injury or death in another.

To convict the Defendant of aggravated assault, the State must prove the following elements:

  1. the defendant caused serious bodily injury to another person; and
  2. the defendant acted purposely or knowingly; or
  3. the defendant, with the use of physical force or contact, caused reasonable apprehension of serious bodily injury or death in another; and
  4. the defendant acted purposely or knowingly.

A person convicted of aggravated assault shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a maximum of 20 years and may be fined a maximum of $50,000.


Kidnapping

A person commits the offense of kidnapping if he knowingly or purposely and without lawful authority restrains another person by:

  1. secreting or holding him/her in a place of isolation; or
  2. using or threatening to use physical force.

To convict the defendant of kidnapping, the state must prove the following elements:

  1. the defendant restrained another person by secreting him/her in a place of isolation, using or threatening to use physical force; and
  2. in doing so, the defendant acted without lawful authority; and
  3. the defendant acted knowingly or purposely.

A person convicted of the offense of kidnapping shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not less than two years or more than a decade and may be fined a maximum of $50,000.


Aggravated Kidnapping

A person commits the offense of aggravated kidnapping if the person knowingly or purposely and without lawful authority restrains another person by either secreting or holding the other person in a place of isolation or by using or threatening to use physical force, with any of the following purposes:

  1.  to hold for ransom or reward or as a shield or hostage;
  2.  to facilitate the commission of any felony or flight after that;
  3.  to inflict bodily injury on or to terrorize the victim or another;
  4.  to interfere with the performance of any governmental or political function; or
  5.  to hold another in a condition of involuntary servitude.

A person convicted of the offense of aggravated kidnapping shall be punished by death or life imprisonment or be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not less than 2 years or more than 100 years and may be fined a maximum amount of $50,000, unless the person has voluntarily released the victim alive, in a safe place, and with no serious bodily injury, in which event the person shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not less than 2 years or more than a decade and may be fined a maximum amount of $50,000.


Additional Resources

Montana Crime Statistics – Visit the neighborhood scout website to read about the crime statistics in Montana, including violent crimes.

Montana Board of Crime Control – Visit the official site of Montana's government to read more about Montana's Board of Crime Control and what they are doing to create safer communities throughout the state of Montana.


Finding a Violent Offense Lawyer in Helena, MT

If you were arrested for a violent offense in Montana, you need to discuss your case confidentially with an experienced Montana criminal defense attorney. Greg Beebe at Beebe Law Firm is prepared to assist you, no matter what criminal charges you face. His familiarity with the courts and the resources available for people accused of violent offenses may help you avoid the more severe criminal penalties.

Greg Beebe will fight and defend anyone in the State of Montana and residents in Lewis and Clark County, Missoula County, Gallatin County or other Montana communities. His office is conveniently located at 1085 Helena Avenue in Helena, Montana, between Idaho Avenue and North Dakota Avenue. Give him a call today at 1 (406) 442-3625.


This article was last updated on Friday, August 5, 2016.

 

Location:

Beebe Law Firm - Criminal Defense & DUI
1085 Helena Ave. Helena, MT 59601